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Will Quality and Standards Keep PACE with For-Profit Seniors Care?

August 24, 2016  · 2 min read

Recent legislation in the United States could see a serious change in the way seniors receive health care. PACE - Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly - provides comprehensive medical and social services to certain frail, community-dwelling elderly individuals, most of whom are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid benefits.


The goal of PACE is to enable seniors to remain living in their homes, while receiving care, avoiding the overwhelming and increasing costs of nursing homes and assisted care facilities.


What’s also different is for the first time for-profit organizations are getting involved. Until recently, only non-profit organizations were allowed to run programs of this nature. The idea is that allowing seniors care to have business potential will mean faster more efficient services for those in need.


With 30 million baby-boomers coming of age and becoming potential new clients over the next two decades – it’s a lucrative market.


But opportunity does not come without concern. There are critics worried about reduced standards, ethics and quality of care. New approaches and technology that benefit bottom-lined based thinking and higher-margins were never part of the equation when the non-profit sector controlled this market.


As PACE becomes a reality, there are some in America rubbing their hands while others are very worried.


Dr. Jane Barratt is the Secretary General of the International Federation on Ageing comprising government and non government members in 62 countries and representing some 50 million older people.


She is an expert with over 35 years experience in both public and private sectors in the fields of public... health, community and aged care, and ageing and disability. She is highly respected internationally as a leading voice on issues and policy concerning seniors and the elderly.


Dr. Barratt is available to speak to media regarding this new legislation, the benefits, the concerns and what to expect as generation of baby-boomers is creating a new industry in at-home care.


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Will Quality and Standards Keep PACE with For-Profit Seniors Care?

August 24, 2016  · 2 min read

Recent legislation in the United States could see a serious change in the way seniors receive health care. PACE - Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly - provides comprehensive medical and social services to certain frail, community-dwelling elderly individuals, most of whom are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid benefits.


The goal of PACE is to enable seniors to remain living in their homes, while receiving care, avoiding the overwhelming and increasing costs of nursing homes and assisted care facilities.


What’s also different is for the first time for-profit organizations are getting involved. Until recently, only non-profit organizations were allowed to run programs of this nature. The idea is that allowing seniors care to have business potential will mean faster more efficient services for those in need.


With 30 million baby-boomers coming of age and becoming potential new clients over the next two decades – it’s a lucrative market.


But opportunity does not come without concern. There are critics worried about reduced standards, ethics and quality of care. New approaches and technology that benefit bottom-lined based thinking and higher-margins were never part of the equation when the non-profit sector controlled this market.


As PACE becomes a reality, there are some in America rubbing their hands while others are very worried.


Dr. Jane Barratt is the Secretary General of the International Federation on Ageing comprising government and non government members in 62 countries and representing some 50 million older people.


She is an expert with over 35 years experience in both public and private sectors in the fields of public... health, community and aged care, and ageing and disability. She is highly respected internationally as a leading voice on issues and policy concerning seniors and the elderly.


Dr. Barratt is available to speak to media regarding this new legislation, the benefits, the concerns and what to expect as generation of baby-boomers is creating a new industry in at-home care.


Source:


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