Select Page

‘Healthy body = Healthy mind’ Might be more than just a saying according to recent research

January 11, 2018  · 1 min read

There is growing evidence that shows keeping physically active is good for brain health.


Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is best described as a slight decline in cognitive abilities like thinking and memory. Although it is not serious enough to interfere with one’s daily living as they age and grow older, a person with MCI has an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia.


The good news: MCI may be treatable.

Several studies are showing that older adults with MCI, halt and in some cases, turn back and improve their conditions with regular exercise and activity. New guidelines by the American Academy of Neurology recommend that people with MCI exercise regularly. In some cases – as little as 20 minutes a day can make a substantial difference.


Will this change the way family doctors talk about growing older with patients? Will physical activity be the game changer for preventing Alzheimer’s?


The science behind brain health and cognitive reserve is complex, with numerous implications for older people and ageing populations – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this subject. Experts on cognitive issues, health promotion and gerontology are available. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Dr. José Ricardo Jáuregui

    Geriatrics and Gerontology
    Ageing Research
    Preventative Medicine
  • a

    Dra. Ida Berenice Molina Aguilera

    Vaccination Strategies
    Vaccination
    Infectious Disases
  • a

    Prof. Roberto Bernabei

    Geriatric Assessment
    Models of Health Service for Older Adults
    Pharmacoepidemiology
  • a

    Liat Ayalon, Ph.D.

    Combating Ageism
    Formal and Informal Care for Older Adults
    Mental Health
    Health Policy Research
    Mental Health Service Use and Clinical Outcomes in Older Adults
    Ageism Discrimination
  • a

    Prof. Yitzhak Brick

    Decent Work for All
    Public Policy
    Technology and Ageing
    Volunteering and Employement of Older Adults
    Health Promotion
View More

‘Healthy body = Healthy mind’ Might be more than just a saying according to recent research

January 11, 2018  · 1 min read

There is growing evidence that shows keeping physically active is good for brain health.


Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is best described as a slight decline in cognitive abilities like thinking and memory. Although it is not serious enough to interfere with one’s daily living as they age and grow older, a person with MCI has an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia.


The good news: MCI may be treatable.

Several studies are showing that older adults with MCI, halt and in some cases, turn back and improve their conditions with regular exercise and activity. New guidelines by the American Academy of Neurology recommend that people with MCI exercise regularly. In some cases – as little as 20 minutes a day can make a substantial difference.


Will this change the way family doctors talk about growing older with patients? Will physical activity be the game changer for preventing Alzheimer’s?


The science behind brain health and cognitive reserve is complex, with numerous implications for older people and ageing populations – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this subject. Experts on cognitive issues, health promotion and gerontology are available. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Baroness Sally Greengross

    Public Policy
    Active Ageing
    Retirement
    Human Rights
    Quality of Care
    Frailty
    Gerontology
    Dementia Care
    Corporate Social Responsibility
    End of Life Care
    Aging and Social Policy
    Longevity
  • a

    Dr. John Beard

    Fostering Healthy Ageing
    Population Ageing
    Epidemiology
    Public Health and Ageing
  • a

    Dr. Toni C. Antonucci

    Public Policy
    Active Ageing
    Elder Abuse
    Human Rights
    Frailty
  • a

    Prof. Ross Andrews

    Vaccine-preventable Diseases
    Skin Infections
  • a

    Dr. Luis M. Gutierrez Robledo

    Adult Vaccination
    Geriatric Medicine
    Health Policy
    Public Health
View More

Recent Articles

Share This