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Does saying ‘I do’ … mean better than worse over the long term?

January 17, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent review study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry links marriage to a lower risk for dementia in later life.


The difference is noteworthy. Among over 800,000 people included in the study, lifelong single people were 42% more likely to develop dementia than those who are married, while people who had been widowed were 20% more likely.


What does the presence or lack of a lifelong partner have to do cognitive decline? Do the psychological or social impacts of being married lead to living healthier lifestyles?


It’s a fascinating concept with many factors at play – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this study and explain how being married can reduce your chances of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


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Does saying ‘I do’ … mean better than worse over the long term?

January 17, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent review study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry links marriage to a lower risk for dementia in later life.


The difference is noteworthy. Among over 800,000 people included in the study, lifelong single people were 42% more likely to develop dementia than those who are married, while people who had been widowed were 20% more likely.


What does the presence or lack of a lifelong partner have to do cognitive decline? Do the psychological or social impacts of being married lead to living healthier lifestyles?


It’s a fascinating concept with many factors at play – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this study and explain how being married can reduce your chances of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


Source:


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