Select Page

Does saying ‘I do’ … mean better than worse over the long term?

January 17, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent review study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry links marriage to a lower risk for dementia in later life.


The difference is noteworthy. Among over 800,000 people included in the study, lifelong single people were 42% more likely to develop dementia than those who are married, while people who had been widowed were 20% more likely.


What does the presence or lack of a lifelong partner have to do cognitive decline? Do the psychological or social impacts of being married lead to living healthier lifestyles?


It’s a fascinating concept with many factors at play – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this study and explain how being married can reduce your chances of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Dra. Celia Alpuche Aranda

    Immunization
    Infectious Diseases
    Bacterial Pathogenesis
    Epidemiological and Molecular Mechanisms
    Vaccination
    Transmittable Diseases
  • a

    Prof. Trisha Dunning

    Diabetes
    Palliative Care
    End of Life Care
    Caregivers
    Health Education
  • a

    Liat Ayalon, Ph.D.

    Combating Ageism
    Formal and Informal Care for Older Adults
    Mental Health
    Health Policy Research
    Mental Health Service Use and Clinical Outcomes in Older Adults
    Ageism Discrimination
  • a

    Doug Earle, CFRE

    Diabetic Retinopathy
    Ageing
    Blindness
    Vision Health
    Vision Research
  • a

    Ms. Donna Butts

    Health and Ageing
    Intergenerational Connections
View More

Does saying ‘I do’ … mean better than worse over the long term?

January 17, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent review study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry links marriage to a lower risk for dementia in later life.


The difference is noteworthy. Among over 800,000 people included in the study, lifelong single people were 42% more likely to develop dementia than those who are married, while people who had been widowed were 20% more likely.


What does the presence or lack of a lifelong partner have to do cognitive decline? Do the psychological or social impacts of being married lead to living healthier lifestyles?


It’s a fascinating concept with many factors at play – that’s where our experts can help. The International Federation on Ageing's Expert Centre has several experts who can speak to this study and explain how being married can reduce your chances of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s. Simply click on one of their icons to arrange an interview.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Dra. Celia Alpuche Aranda

    Immunization
    Infectious Diseases
    Bacterial Pathogenesis
    Epidemiological and Molecular Mechanisms
    Vaccination
    Transmittable Diseases
  • a

    Mr. Mathew Cherian

    Elder Abuse
    Human Rights
    Ageing in Place
    Home Care Public Policy
  • a

    Mr. Don M. Blandin

    Pensions
    Retirement
    Public Policy
    Coalitions
    Elder Fraud and Financial Exploitation
    Investor Education
    Investor Protection
  • a

    Ms. Donna Butts

    Health and Ageing
    Intergenerational Connections
  • a

    Dr. Lauren Beaupre

    Population Health
    Frailty
    Cognitive Impairment
    Re-enablement
View More

Recent Articles

Share This