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How poverty changes the brain - and what this means for an ageing population

February 05, 2018  · 1 min read

A 2014 report by Economic Mobility Pathways in Boston found that a person's brain may play a significant role in whether or not that person can rise out of poverty - is it really as simple as it sounds though?


When an individual lives in poverty, research suggests the brain's limbic system is constantly sending fear and stress messages, overloading a person's ability to solve problems, set goals, and complete tasks.

This leaves the brain overwhelmed and incapable of prioritizing or taking on other things.


It's a constant state of stress and it can last for generations.


But there is hope that the cycle can be broken. If so, it may impact every demographic and segment of the population.


So, what will this mean for the next generation of older adults? Will these results trickle up? Will it mean older adults living in poverty may be better supported?


It's not an easy topic to break down. That's where the experts from the IFA come in. Click on one of the icons to arrange an interview today.


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How poverty changes the brain - and what this means for an ageing population

February 05, 2018  · 1 min read

A 2014 report by Economic Mobility Pathways in Boston found that a person's brain may play a significant role in whether or not that person can rise out of poverty - is it really as simple as it sounds though?


When an individual lives in poverty, research suggests the brain's limbic system is constantly sending fear and stress messages, overloading a person's ability to solve problems, set goals, and complete tasks.

This leaves the brain overwhelmed and incapable of prioritizing or taking on other things.


It's a constant state of stress and it can last for generations.


But there is hope that the cycle can be broken. If so, it may impact every demographic and segment of the population.


So, what will this mean for the next generation of older adults? Will these results trickle up? Will it mean older adults living in poverty may be better supported?


It's not an easy topic to break down. That's where the experts from the IFA come in. Click on one of the icons to arrange an interview today.


Source:


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