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'Super agers' share how they stay sharp

April 05, 2018  · 1 min read

Research has shown that while the brain itself changes with age, it is possible to avoid severe cognitive impairment and diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The SuperAging study based in Chicago is getting to the bottom of this – by studying people in their 80s and 90s with maintained cognitive function.


One hint emerging from the study is that the cortex, or outer brain layer, is thicker than average among these ‘Super agers’. The rate their brains change at is also slower than the average older person. One particular brain cell called a ‘von Economo neuron’ is also more common among this group.


There is still more to know about these different in brain changes with age, and what lifestyle changes people can do to put themselves in the ‘Super ager’ group while lowering the risk of dementia.


To explore this further, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing where world-renowned experts in the field of cognitive reserve will share the latest research. Until then, connect with global cognitive reserve leaders from the IFA Expert Centre.


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'Super agers' share how they stay sharp

April 05, 2018  · 1 min read

Research has shown that while the brain itself changes with age, it is possible to avoid severe cognitive impairment and diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The SuperAging study based in Chicago is getting to the bottom of this – by studying people in their 80s and 90s with maintained cognitive function.


One hint emerging from the study is that the cortex, or outer brain layer, is thicker than average among these ‘Super agers’. The rate their brains change at is also slower than the average older person. One particular brain cell called a ‘von Economo neuron’ is also more common among this group.


There is still more to know about these different in brain changes with age, and what lifestyle changes people can do to put themselves in the ‘Super ager’ group while lowering the risk of dementia.


To explore this further, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing where world-renowned experts in the field of cognitive reserve will share the latest research. Until then, connect with global cognitive reserve leaders from the IFA Expert Centre.


Source:


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    Dr. Edward Leung

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