Select Page

'Super agers' share how they stay sharp

April 05, 2018  · 1 min read

Research has shown that while the brain itself changes with age, it is possible to avoid severe cognitive impairment and diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The SuperAging study based in Chicago is getting to the bottom of this – by studying people in their 80s and 90s with maintained cognitive function.


One hint emerging from the study is that the cortex, or outer brain layer, is thicker than average among these ‘Super agers’. The rate their brains change at is also slower than the average older person. One particular brain cell called a ‘von Economo neuron’ is also more common among this group.


There is still more to know about these different in brain changes with age, and what lifestyle changes people can do to put themselves in the ‘Super ager’ group while lowering the risk of dementia.


To explore this further, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing where world-renowned experts in the field of cognitive reserve will share the latest research. Until then, connect with global cognitive reserve leaders from the IFA Expert Centre.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Mr. Mark Brandon, OAM.

    Leadership Development
    Management
    Business Strategy
    Policy
    Quality and Education in Aged Care
  • a

    Dr. Isabella Aboderin

    Older Adult Rights
    Ageing Policy and Development
    Social Determinants of Health in Old Age
    Health Systems
    Access to Health Care
    Intergenerational Support
    Family Relationships
  • a

    Ms. Donna Butts

    Health and Ageing
    Intergenerational Connections
  • a

    Dra. Ida Berenice Molina Aguilera

    Vaccination Strategies
    Vaccination
    Infectious Disases
  • a

    Prof. Jaco Hoffman

    Intergenerational Issues
    Population Ageing
    Public Policy
    Hiv/Aids
View More

'Super agers' share how they stay sharp

April 05, 2018  · 1 min read

Research has shown that while the brain itself changes with age, it is possible to avoid severe cognitive impairment and diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The SuperAging study based in Chicago is getting to the bottom of this – by studying people in their 80s and 90s with maintained cognitive function.


One hint emerging from the study is that the cortex, or outer brain layer, is thicker than average among these ‘Super agers’. The rate their brains change at is also slower than the average older person. One particular brain cell called a ‘von Economo neuron’ is also more common among this group.


There is still more to know about these different in brain changes with age, and what lifestyle changes people can do to put themselves in the ‘Super ager’ group while lowering the risk of dementia.


To explore this further, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing where world-renowned experts in the field of cognitive reserve will share the latest research. Until then, connect with global cognitive reserve leaders from the IFA Expert Centre.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Prof. Leocadio Rodriguez Mañas

    Frailty
    Epidemiology
    Diabetes
  • a

    Dr. José-Luis Díaz-Ortega

    Measles
    Immunology
    Epidemiology
    Vaccinations
    Infant Mortality
  • a

    Mr. David Doyle

    Smart Housing
    Monitoring
    Social Technologies in Ageing
    Connected Technologies
  • a

    Dr. Pat Armstrong

    Decent Work for All
    Feminist Political Economy
    Women and Work
    Health Policy
    Health Care
    Long-Term Care
  • a

    Dr. John Beard

    Fostering Healthy Ageing
    Population Ageing
    Epidemiology
    Public Health and Ageing
View More

Recent Articles

Share This