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Time to get up: Too much sitting has long-term impacts on brain health

April 20, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent study looking at adults between the ages of 45 and 75 observed worse brain health among those who spend more time sitting. One concerning element of the study was that the part of the brain examined in the study was the medial temporal lobe, which is important for memory.


This could have implications not only for individual health, but also workplaces and societies. How can public policies help us sit less, move more, and promote our brain health and cognitive reserve as we get older?


More research is needed to understand how living a sedentary lifestyle impacts the brain. However, there is an overwhelming body of evidence to inform the public on how to help increase cognitive reserve throughout their lifetime.


Attend the 14th Global Conference on Ageing to hear from international experts on the roles that individuals, health professionals, governments, industry leaders, and civil society can have in this public health issue (www.ifa2018.com).


Many of the IFA experts have knowledge and expertise on how to promote and maintain brain health and cognitive reserve. For example, Dr. Kaarin Anstey is a psychology and neuroscience expert who explores the epidemiology of cognition and dementia. Similarly, Prof. Perminder Sachdev is a neuropsychiatry expert revolutionizing understanding of the ageing brain, apropos of lifestyle choices. Explore the IFA Expert Centre to learn even more about what leaders in the field of ageing are doing to promote cognitive reserve.


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Time to get up: Too much sitting has long-term impacts on brain health

April 20, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent study looking at adults between the ages of 45 and 75 observed worse brain health among those who spend more time sitting. One concerning element of the study was that the part of the brain examined in the study was the medial temporal lobe, which is important for memory.


This could have implications not only for individual health, but also workplaces and societies. How can public policies help us sit less, move more, and promote our brain health and cognitive reserve as we get older?


More research is needed to understand how living a sedentary lifestyle impacts the brain. However, there is an overwhelming body of evidence to inform the public on how to help increase cognitive reserve throughout their lifetime.


Attend the 14th Global Conference on Ageing to hear from international experts on the roles that individuals, health professionals, governments, industry leaders, and civil society can have in this public health issue (www.ifa2018.com).


Many of the IFA experts have knowledge and expertise on how to promote and maintain brain health and cognitive reserve. For example, Dr. Kaarin Anstey is a psychology and neuroscience expert who explores the epidemiology of cognition and dementia. Similarly, Prof. Perminder Sachdev is a neuropsychiatry expert revolutionizing understanding of the ageing brain, apropos of lifestyle choices. Explore the IFA Expert Centre to learn even more about what leaders in the field of ageing are doing to promote cognitive reserve.


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    Dr. Stephen E. Judd

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