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Heads up: Brain injury linked with dementia later in life

May 04, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent Danish study of 2.8 million people found that those who had experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) had a 24% higher risk of being diagnosed with dementia later on, regardless of age. The authors of the study also pointed out that the risk of long-term complications can be lowered with cognitive rehabilitation.


Among people who had a TBI, the risk of developing dementia was highest among the following groups:

• men,

• those with a more severe TBI, and

• those with more than one TBI.


While the risks of injury and developing dementia may worry some, it is worth noting that many TBI’s can be prevented. Some ways to prevent TBI include using seatbelts, wearing helmets while cycling or playing sports, as well as altering home environments to prevent a trip or fall. Age-friendly public policies that promote safer built environments and enforce the use of protective equipment can also help prevent TBI.


To learn more about cognitive rehabilitation, lowering dementia risk, and built environments, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference, where speakers will cover all three of these topics. The IFA Expert Centre also features a number of relevant experts in these subject areas, such as:

• Age-friendly policies to prevent traumatic brain injuries: Mr. Hugh O’Connor

• Promoting and maintaining brain health and cognitive reserve: Dr. Gunhild Waldemar

• Rehabilitation for people with cognitive impairments: Dr. Rosalie Wang


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Heads up: Brain injury linked with dementia later in life

May 04, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent Danish study of 2.8 million people found that those who had experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) had a 24% higher risk of being diagnosed with dementia later on, regardless of age. The authors of the study also pointed out that the risk of long-term complications can be lowered with cognitive rehabilitation.


Among people who had a TBI, the risk of developing dementia was highest among the following groups:

• men,

• those with a more severe TBI, and

• those with more than one TBI.


While the risks of injury and developing dementia may worry some, it is worth noting that many TBI’s can be prevented. Some ways to prevent TBI include using seatbelts, wearing helmets while cycling or playing sports, as well as altering home environments to prevent a trip or fall. Age-friendly public policies that promote safer built environments and enforce the use of protective equipment can also help prevent TBI.


To learn more about cognitive rehabilitation, lowering dementia risk, and built environments, register for the IFA 14th Global Conference, where speakers will cover all three of these topics. The IFA Expert Centre also features a number of relevant experts in these subject areas, such as:

• Age-friendly policies to prevent traumatic brain injuries: Mr. Hugh O’Connor

• Promoting and maintaining brain health and cognitive reserve: Dr. Gunhild Waldemar

• Rehabilitation for people with cognitive impairments: Dr. Rosalie Wang


Source:


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