Select Page

Cognitive decline should not be confused with normal ageing

June 05, 2018  · 2 min read

Physical activity has been celebrated as a “miracle drug” for both physical and mental health. Specifically, it is recommended to combine aerobic exercise and strength training to have optimal health impacts.


A recent systematic review revealed that increasing the number of hours of being physically active was correlated with improved cognitive performance. This research adds to a quickly growing body of knowledge that regular physical activity supports the improvement or maintenance of cognitive reserve across the lifespan. Professor Yaakov Stern of Columbia University is an expert at the forefront of this emerging topic, consider reaching out.


In response to this article, Dr. John Beard, the World Health Organization’s Director of the Department of Ageing and Life Course, recently tweeted an important point: “Actually, I don’t want to keep my brain young, I like how it has developed over the years and the wisdom and tolerance that experience has given me. What I want to avoid is cognitive decline. No need to reinforce #ageism to encourage physical activity”. As a global expert in ageing, Dr. Beard is a strong advocate against ageist stereotypes.


The stereotypes about severe cognitive impairment being an inevitable part of ageing, i.e. the “senior moment”, are inaccurate and ageist. Considering that physical activity and other lifestyle choices can impact older peoples’ brain health, it should not be assumed that dementia is a normal or natural part of ageing. With this shift in perspective, the public could feel more empowered to take charge of their brain and cognitive health.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Mr. Mathew Cherian

    Elder Abuse
    Human Rights
    Ageing in Place
    Home Care Public Policy
  • a

    Dr. Steen Hasselbalch

    Complex Intervention Strategies
    Neurodegenerative Disease
    Biomarkers
    Psychiatric Diseases
    Dementia Disorders
  • a

    Prof. Suzanne Martin

    New and Emerging Technologies in Health and Social Care
    Disabilities
    Human Computer Interaction
    Occupational Healthcare
    Community Care Policy and Practice
    Electronic Assistive Technologies
    Ageing in Place
    Supported Housing Options
  • a

    Dra. Ida Berenice Molina Aguilera

    Vaccination Strategies
    Vaccination
    Infectious Disases
  • a

    Ms. Donna Butts

    Health and Ageing
    Intergenerational Connections
View More

Cognitive decline should not be confused with normal ageing

June 05, 2018  · 2 min read

Physical activity has been celebrated as a “miracle drug” for both physical and mental health. Specifically, it is recommended to combine aerobic exercise and strength training to have optimal health impacts.


A recent systematic review revealed that increasing the number of hours of being physically active was correlated with improved cognitive performance. This research adds to a quickly growing body of knowledge that regular physical activity supports the improvement or maintenance of cognitive reserve across the lifespan. Professor Yaakov Stern of Columbia University is an expert at the forefront of this emerging topic, consider reaching out.


In response to this article, Dr. John Beard, the World Health Organization’s Director of the Department of Ageing and Life Course, recently tweeted an important point: “Actually, I don’t want to keep my brain young, I like how it has developed over the years and the wisdom and tolerance that experience has given me. What I want to avoid is cognitive decline. No need to reinforce #ageism to encourage physical activity”. As a global expert in ageing, Dr. Beard is a strong advocate against ageist stereotypes.


The stereotypes about severe cognitive impairment being an inevitable part of ageing, i.e. the “senior moment”, are inaccurate and ageist. Considering that physical activity and other lifestyle choices can impact older peoples’ brain health, it should not be assumed that dementia is a normal or natural part of ageing. With this shift in perspective, the public could feel more empowered to take charge of their brain and cognitive health.


Source:


Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Dr. César Misael Gómez Altamirano

    Vaccination
  • a

    Prof. Martin Knapp

    Long Term Care
    Dementia
    Community Care Policy
    Health Economics
    Health Policy
    Mental Health Economics
    Social Services
    Social Care
  • a

    Emily A. Greenfield, Ph.D.

    Ageing
    Life Course Human Development
    Social Services
    Theory Development
    Loneliness
    Longevity
    Social Inequality
    Social Isolation
    Family Studies
    Evaluation
    Social Relationships and Health
    Aging
  • a

    Dr. Jesús Felipe González Roldán

    Vaccination
    Education for Health
    Public Policies
    Health Promotion
    Zoonoses
    Noncommunicable Diseases
    Communicable Diseases
    Addictions
    Public Health
    Administration in Health
    Epidemiological Situations
  • a

    Prof. Raina MacIntyre

    Vaccination
    COVID-19
    Biosecurity
    Epidemic Response and Emerging Infectious Diseases
    Vaccinology
    Personal Protective Equipment
    Coronavirus
View More

Recent Articles

Share This