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Returning Home After Entering Long-Term Care

July 03, 2018  · 2 min read

With a rapidly ageing global population, long-term care homes are increasingly in demand to help meet the needs of older people. For many older people, entering long-term care is a final move, and the role these facilities have in promoting functional ability cannot be understated.


According to an article on the Conversation, there are more than 170,000 older adults living in 2,700 nursing homes across Australia, which comprises more than 6% of people aged 65 and older. Recently, The West Australian profiled an 86-year older woman named Jean O’Connor who moved into a long-term care facility while living with chronic pain and severe mental illness. Unlike most of her fellow residents, after five months of occupational therapy and a revised prescription plan, Jean was able to move back to her home and live independently.


The IFA Expert Centre can connect individuals interested in learning more about long-term care with world leaders in the field of ageing. As Chief Policy and Regulatory Officer with Estia Health, Mr Mark Brandon is an expert in ensuring health and aged standards in long-term care are met and improved. Additionally, if you wish to learn more about how long-term care homes can adapt to meet the needs of specific populations of older, for example older LGBTQI people, as well as how long-term care facilities can counter elder abuse, contact Prof. Marie Beaulieu.


Promoting healthy aging and innovations in long-term care are both central themes at the upcoming IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing. These topics and more will be explored over the course of three days, with global thought leaders in the field of ageing and related fields convening in Toronto, Canada from 8-10 August 2018.


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Returning Home After Entering Long-Term Care

July 03, 2018  · 2 min read

With a rapidly ageing global population, long-term care homes are increasingly in demand to help meet the needs of older people. For many older people, entering long-term care is a final move, and the role these facilities have in promoting functional ability cannot be understated.


According to an article on the Conversation, there are more than 170,000 older adults living in 2,700 nursing homes across Australia, which comprises more than 6% of people aged 65 and older. Recently, The West Australian profiled an 86-year older woman named Jean O’Connor who moved into a long-term care facility while living with chronic pain and severe mental illness. Unlike most of her fellow residents, after five months of occupational therapy and a revised prescription plan, Jean was able to move back to her home and live independently.


The IFA Expert Centre can connect individuals interested in learning more about long-term care with world leaders in the field of ageing. As Chief Policy and Regulatory Officer with Estia Health, Mr Mark Brandon is an expert in ensuring health and aged standards in long-term care are met and improved. Additionally, if you wish to learn more about how long-term care homes can adapt to meet the needs of specific populations of older, for example older LGBTQI people, as well as how long-term care facilities can counter elder abuse, contact Prof. Marie Beaulieu.


Promoting healthy aging and innovations in long-term care are both central themes at the upcoming IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing. These topics and more will be explored over the course of three days, with global thought leaders in the field of ageing and related fields convening in Toronto, Canada from 8-10 August 2018.


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