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Coffee lovers rejoice! Study demonstrates coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death

July 10, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine is a cause for celebration for coffee drinkers. The study of close to half a million adults in Britain demonstrated that those who drank coffee had a slightly lower risk (10 to 15 percent) of mortality after ten years than those who did not drank coffee.


The decreased likelihood of death was even demonstrated in those who drank decaffeinated coffee. The reasons for these findings are unclear, with previous studies pointing to possibilities ranging from the high level of antioxidants in coffee to its positive impact on inflammation. Yet, coffee is just one part of a well-rounded diet. According to the United States National Institute on Aging, proper nutrition is an important part of healthy ageing, as older people may require different nutrients in different quantities than their younger counterparts. Furthermore, the University of Waterloo Kinesiology Department emphasizes that proper nutrition can be linked to things such as cognitive ability and long-term care residency, and thus can require more attention as we age.


Contact IFA Expert Prof. Jean Woo for more information on the impact of nutrition on ageing and consider attending the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing, where the impact of nutrition on wellbeing and health in later life will be discussed by numerous scholars under the key theme ‘toward healthy ageing’. Visit www.IFA2018.com for more information.


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Coffee lovers rejoice! Study demonstrates coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death

July 10, 2018  · 1 min read

A recent study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine is a cause for celebration for coffee drinkers. The study of close to half a million adults in Britain demonstrated that those who drank coffee had a slightly lower risk (10 to 15 percent) of mortality after ten years than those who did not drank coffee.


The decreased likelihood of death was even demonstrated in those who drank decaffeinated coffee. The reasons for these findings are unclear, with previous studies pointing to possibilities ranging from the high level of antioxidants in coffee to its positive impact on inflammation. Yet, coffee is just one part of a well-rounded diet. According to the United States National Institute on Aging, proper nutrition is an important part of healthy ageing, as older people may require different nutrients in different quantities than their younger counterparts. Furthermore, the University of Waterloo Kinesiology Department emphasizes that proper nutrition can be linked to things such as cognitive ability and long-term care residency, and thus can require more attention as we age.


Contact IFA Expert Prof. Jean Woo for more information on the impact of nutrition on ageing and consider attending the IFA 14th Global Conference on Ageing, where the impact of nutrition on wellbeing and health in later life will be discussed by numerous scholars under the key theme ‘toward healthy ageing’. Visit www.IFA2018.com for more information.


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