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Combating myths and understanding Dementia

November 06, 2018  · 2 min read

Health misinformation has a significant role in influencing the health and well-being of older people, a recent article in the Toronto Star states. 



To highlight this role, the article seeks to dispel five common myths about Alzheimer’s and dementia. They include:

  • Myth 1: Memory loss is a natural part of aging
  • Myth 2: Only older adults can get Alzheimer’s disease
  • Myth 3: Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same thing
  • Myth 4: Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary
  • Myth 5: There is nothing that can be done about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease


While fear and denial are common for older people and their loved ones around Alzheimer’s and dementia, inaccurate information can increase confusion and anxiety for both patients and caregivers. It is important to be aware of symptoms and remember that Alzheimer’s and dementia are not inevitable consequences of ageing. 


An immense amount of research is currently being conducted to better understand, treat and ultimately prevent all forms of dementia, research which will perhaps contribute to less misinformation about both conditions.


Interested in learning more? The IFA Expert Centre includes many prominent leaders in the field who can provide insight and clarity around dementia and Alzheimer’s. For example, Prof Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, Prof Perminder Sachdev, Co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at the University of New South Wales, and Prof Yaakov Stern, Professor of Neuropsychology at Columbia University, are world leaders in the field of ageing, cognitive health and cognitive reserve.  

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Combating myths and understanding Dementia

November 06, 2018  · 2 min read

Health misinformation has a significant role in influencing the health and well-being of older people, a recent article in the Toronto Star states. 



To highlight this role, the article seeks to dispel five common myths about Alzheimer’s and dementia. They include:

  • Myth 1: Memory loss is a natural part of aging
  • Myth 2: Only older adults can get Alzheimer’s disease
  • Myth 3: Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same thing
  • Myth 4: Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary
  • Myth 5: There is nothing that can be done about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease


While fear and denial are common for older people and their loved ones around Alzheimer’s and dementia, inaccurate information can increase confusion and anxiety for both patients and caregivers. It is important to be aware of symptoms and remember that Alzheimer’s and dementia are not inevitable consequences of ageing. 


An immense amount of research is currently being conducted to better understand, treat and ultimately prevent all forms of dementia, research which will perhaps contribute to less misinformation about both conditions.


Interested in learning more? The IFA Expert Centre includes many prominent leaders in the field who can provide insight and clarity around dementia and Alzheimer’s. For example, Prof Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, Prof Perminder Sachdev, Co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at the University of New South Wales, and Prof Yaakov Stern, Professor of Neuropsychology at Columbia University, are world leaders in the field of ageing, cognitive health and cognitive reserve.  

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