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Combating myths and understanding Dementia

November 06, 2018  · 2 min read

Health misinformation has a significant role in influencing the health and well-being of older people, a recent article in the Toronto Star states.



To highlight this role, the article seeks to dispel five common myths about Alzheimer’s and dementia. They include:

  • Myth 1: Memory loss is a natural part of aging
  • Myth 2: Only older adults can get Alzheimer’s disease
  • Myth 3: Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same thing
  • Myth 4: Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary
  • Myth 5: There is nothing that can be done about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease


While fear and denial are common for older people and their loved ones around Alzheimer’s and dementia, inaccurate information can increase confusion and anxiety for both patients and caregivers. It is important to be aware of symptoms and remember that Alzheimer’s and dementia are not inevitable consequences of ageing.


An immense amount of research is currently being conducted to better understand, treat and ultimately prevent all forms of dementia, research which will perhaps contribute to less misinformation about both conditions.


Interested in learning more? The IFA Expert Centre includes many prominent leaders in the field who can provide insight and clarity around dementia and Alzheimer’s. For example, Prof Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, Prof Perminder Sachdev, Co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at the University of New South Wales, and Prof Yaakov Stern, Professor of Neuropsychology at Columbia University, are world leaders in the field of ageing, cognitive health and cognitive reserve.

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    Dr. Carlos Alberto Cano Gutiérrez

    Alzheimer's Disease
    Geriatric Medicine
    Geriatric and Long-Term Care
    University Administation
    Dementia Care
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    Dr. Patrick Dixon

    Connected Technologies
    Retirement
    Public Policy
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    Active Ageing
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    Prof. Dr Hans-Peter Hammes

    DR Barometer Program
    Diabetic Retinopathy
    Biochemistry
    Diabetic Microangiopathy
    Medical Retina
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    Dr. Fiona Aspinal

    Social Policy
    Re-enablement
    Palliative Care Provision and Quality
  • a

    Dr. Patrick Dixon

    Connected Technologies
    Retirement
    Public Policy
    Work
    Active Ageing
View More

Combating myths and understanding Dementia

November 06, 2018  · 2 min read

Health misinformation has a significant role in influencing the health and well-being of older people, a recent article in the Toronto Star states.



To highlight this role, the article seeks to dispel five common myths about Alzheimer’s and dementia. They include:

  • Myth 1: Memory loss is a natural part of aging
  • Myth 2: Only older adults can get Alzheimer’s disease
  • Myth 3: Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same thing
  • Myth 4: Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary
  • Myth 5: There is nothing that can be done about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease


While fear and denial are common for older people and their loved ones around Alzheimer’s and dementia, inaccurate information can increase confusion and anxiety for both patients and caregivers. It is important to be aware of symptoms and remember that Alzheimer’s and dementia are not inevitable consequences of ageing.


An immense amount of research is currently being conducted to better understand, treat and ultimately prevent all forms of dementia, research which will perhaps contribute to less misinformation about both conditions.


Interested in learning more? The IFA Expert Centre includes many prominent leaders in the field who can provide insight and clarity around dementia and Alzheimer’s. For example, Prof Linda Clare, Professor of Clinical Psychology of Ageing and Dementia at the University of Exeter, Prof Perminder Sachdev, Co-Director of the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA) at the University of New South Wales, and Prof Yaakov Stern, Professor of Neuropsychology at Columbia University, are world leaders in the field of ageing, cognitive health and cognitive reserve.

Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Prof. Kaarin Anstey

    Fostering Healthy Ageing
    Older Drivers
    Public Health and Health Services
    Neurosciences
    Psychology
    Cognitive Sciences
    Aged Health Care
    Geriatrics and Gerontology
    Developmental Psychology and Ageing
    Mental Health
    Health Promotion
    Epidemiology
    Cognitive Reserve
  • a

    Prof. Paolo Bonanni

    Preventative Medicine
    Infectious Diseases
    Epidemiology
    Vaccination Strategies
  • a

    Dr. Luis M. Gutierrez Robledo

    Adult Vaccination
    Geriatric Medicine
    Health Policy
    Public Health
  • a

    Prof. Kaarin Anstey

    Fostering Healthy Ageing
    Older Drivers
    Public Health and Health Services
    Neurosciences
    Psychology
    Cognitive Sciences
    Aged Health Care
    Geriatrics and Gerontology
    Developmental Psychology and Ageing
    Mental Health
    Health Promotion
    Epidemiology
    Cognitive Reserve
View More

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