Select Page

Combating ageism through positivity and respect of older persons

January 08, 2019  · 2 min read

People around the world are living longer, but despite this rapidly changing population demographic, global attitudes towards ageing and older people remain overwhelmingly negative, and fatalistic. Even more problematic is the evidence that highlights the role of ageism in diminishing the health and wellbeing of older people.



A recent article by CNN identifies many studies illustrating the dangers of ageism. A World Health Organization (WHO) survey from 2016 highlighted that 60% of respondents believe that older people are not respected, and this has serious implications for older people.


An Orb Media analysis showed that lower poverty and better health was common in countries that respected their older people, while a study in Ireland identified that mental health issues such as depression and anxiety are “more common among people with negative ideas about ageing.”



According to CNN, “in 2016, WHO acknowledged the need for ageism to be globally addressed and highlighted that ageism is most likely more widespread than sexism and racism.” The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) is proud to work with the WHO and other organizations internationally in combating ageism.


Through initiatives that promote a life-course approach to health, such as adult vaccination and vision health, or in spreading awareness of the importance of age-friendly environments that promote healthy ageing, the IFA works at many levels to address systemic ageism. Additionally, through the WHO Global Campaign to Combat Ageism, the IFA maintains a critical role in advancing the work of the campaign. To learn more about the importance of combating ageism to promote healthy ageing and maintain functional ability, contact IFA Secretary General Dr Jane Barratt through ExpertFile.

Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Dr. Jesús Felipe González Roldán

    Education for Health
    Public Policies
    Health Promotion
    Zoonoses
    Noncommunicable Diseases
    Communicable Diseases
    Addictions
    Public Health
    Administration in Health
    Epidemiological Situations
  • a

    Dr. Jean-Pierre Michel

    Vaccines 4 Life Program
    Public Palliative Medicine
    Geriatric Medicine
    Adult Vaccination
  • a

    Dr. Javier Garau

    Primary Respiratory Pathogens
    Epidemiology
    Management of Community-Acquired Infection
    Epidemiology and Antibiotic Resistance
  • a

    Dr. Fiona Aspinal

    Social Policy
    Re-enablement
    Palliative Care Provision and Quality
  • a

    Prof. Antony Bayer

    Frailty
    Re-enablement
    Cognitive impairment and dementia
    Research Methods and Older People
View More

Combating ageism through positivity and respect of older persons

January 08, 2019  · 2 min read

People around the world are living longer, but despite this rapidly changing population demographic, global attitudes towards ageing and older people remain overwhelmingly negative, and fatalistic. Even more problematic is the evidence that highlights the role of ageism in diminishing the health and wellbeing of older people.



A recent article by CNN identifies many studies illustrating the dangers of ageism. A World Health Organization (WHO) survey from 2016 highlighted that 60% of respondents believe that older people are not respected, and this has serious implications for older people.


An Orb Media analysis showed that lower poverty and better health was common in countries that respected their older people, while a study in Ireland identified that mental health issues such as depression and anxiety are “more common among people with negative ideas about ageing.”



According to CNN, “in 2016, WHO acknowledged the need for ageism to be globally addressed and highlighted that ageism is most likely more widespread than sexism and racism.” The International Federation on Ageing (IFA) is proud to work with the WHO and other organizations internationally in combating ageism.


Through initiatives that promote a life-course approach to health, such as adult vaccination and vision health, or in spreading awareness of the importance of age-friendly environments that promote healthy ageing, the IFA works at many levels to address systemic ageism. Additionally, through the WHO Global Campaign to Combat Ageism, the IFA maintains a critical role in advancing the work of the campaign. To learn more about the importance of combating ageism to promote healthy ageing and maintain functional ability, contact IFA Secretary General Dr Jane Barratt through ExpertFile.

Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Baroness Sally Greengross

    Public Policy
    Active Ageing
    Retirement
    Human Rights
    Quality of Care
    Frailty
    Gerontology
    Dementia Care
    Corporate Social Responsibility
    End of Life Care
    Aging and Social Policy
    Longevity
  • a

    Dr. Carlos Alberto Cano Gutiérrez

    Alzheimer's Disease
    Geriatric Medicine
    Geriatric and Long-Term Care
    University Administation
    Dementia Care
  • a

    Prof., Dr. Mike Martin

    Middle Adulthood
    Social Development In Old Age
    Cognitive Ageing
    Resources and Skills in Everyday Life
    Lifespan Development
  • a

    Dr. Pat Armstrong

    Decent Work for All
    Feminist Political Economy
    Women and Work
    Health Policy
    Health Care
    Long-Term Care
  • a

    Prof. Denise Eldemire-Shearer

    Education and Training
    Active Ageing
    Lifelong Learning
    Ageing in Place
    Frailty
    Public Policy
View More

Recent Articles

Share This