Select Page

The future of work is here, and the rights of older people are at stake

February 08, 2019  · 2 min read

The International Labour Organization (ILO) is an international organization that aims to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues. In January 2019, the ILO celebrated the beginning of its 100th year with the launch of the report on the Global Commission on the Future of Work.



This report examines the alternatives for addressing the changes and challenges in the world of work – including how to better protect and support older workers. In addition, the ILO also very recently released a working paper on the future of work in the health care sector, including long-term care. By using a human-centered approach, the ILO is exploring and proposing ways to build more inclusive and active societies. 


Older persons are often left behind in international development and universal human rights – including progress in decent work, lifelong learning, and social protection coverage. As an NGO with general consultative status with the United Nations (UN) Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the International Federation on Ageing (IFA) continuously advocates for the rights of older persons to be protected and respected by influencing and shaping age-related policies including those above.



This year the IFA has expanded its representation at the UN in Geneva with the addition of a new IFA UN Representative, Dr Xenia Scheil-Adlung. Prior to her current work as an independent expert in global health and long-term care policy, Xenia worked as a Senior Health Policy Coordinator for the ILO, and as a Head of Division in the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Social Affairs for the Federation Government of Germany. Contact Dr Scheil-Adlung to learn more about how health and social policies can better protect older persons’ rights to health and social security.

Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Mr. Rodd Bond

    Age Friendly Environments
    Public Policy
    Built Environment
    Active Ageing
    Education and Training
    Urban Planning
    Age-friendly Environments
  • a

    A/Prof. Reshma A. Merchant

    Long-Term Care
    Cognitive Frailty
    Long Term Care
    Internal Medicine
    Gerantology
    Academic Administration
    Sarcopenia
    Successful Ageing in the Community
  • a

    Rintaro Mori

    Global Health
    Health Policy
    Population Ageing
    Women's and Children's Health
    Sustainability
  • a

    Prof. Andrew Byrnes

    Combating Ageism
    Law
    Public Policy
    Human Rights
  • a

    Dr. José-Luis Díaz-Ortega

    Vaccination
    COVID-19
    Measles
    Immunology
    Epidemiology
    Infant Mortality
    Coronavirus
View More

The future of work is here, and the rights of older people are at stake

February 08, 2019  · 2 min read

The International Labour Organization (ILO) is an international organization that aims to promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues. In January 2019, the ILO celebrated the beginning of its 100th year with the launch of the report on the Global Commission on the Future of Work.



This report examines the alternatives for addressing the changes and challenges in the world of work – including how to better protect and support older workers. In addition, the ILO also very recently released a working paper on the future of work in the health care sector, including long-term care. By using a human-centered approach, the ILO is exploring and proposing ways to build more inclusive and active societies. 


Older persons are often left behind in international development and universal human rights – including progress in decent work, lifelong learning, and social protection coverage. As an NGO with general consultative status with the United Nations (UN) Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the International Federation on Ageing (IFA) continuously advocates for the rights of older persons to be protected and respected by influencing and shaping age-related policies including those above.



This year the IFA has expanded its representation at the UN in Geneva with the addition of a new IFA UN Representative, Dr Xenia Scheil-Adlung. Prior to her current work as an independent expert in global health and long-term care policy, Xenia worked as a Senior Health Policy Coordinator for the ILO, and as a Head of Division in the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Social Affairs for the Federation Government of Germany. Contact Dr Scheil-Adlung to learn more about how health and social policies can better protect older persons’ rights to health and social security.

Featured Experts:
Other Experts:
  • a

    Doug Earle, CFRE

    Diabetic Retinopathy
    Ageing
    Blindness
    Vision Health
    Vision Research
  • a

    Prof. Denise Eldemire-Shearer

    Education and Training
    Active Ageing
    Lifelong Learning
    Ageing in Place
    Frailty
    Public Policy
  • a

    Dr. Katherine McGilton

    Care of Persons with Cognitive Impairement
    Intervantions and Models of Care Delivery
    Re-enablement
    Dementia Care
    Long Term Care
  • a

    Dr. Tiziano Melchiorre

    Prevention of Blindness
    Low Vision Rehabilitation
    Institutional Lobbying
    Political Lobbying
  • a

    Dra. María Eugenia Jiménez Corona

    Vaccination
    COVID-19
    Organization Analysis
    Fund Raising
    Immunology
    Vaccination Strategies
    Epidemiology
    Campaigns
    Organization & Management
    Coronavirus
View More

Recent Articles

Share This