Select Page

With an ageing population, one of the greatest challenges is ensuring that policies provide the best possible quality of life for all across all dimensions of society. The goal of the Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program is to provide professionals in health and aging with the experience and skills necessary to help lead this effort, and in so doing, shape a healthy and productive future for older Americans.

The Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program offers two different tracks for individual placement:
(1) a residential track that includes a nine-to-12-month placement in Washington, D.C. or at a state agency (as a legislative assistant in Congress, a professional staff member in an executive branch agency or in a policy organization);
(2) a non-residential track that includes a health policy project and brief placement(s) throughout the year at relevant sites.  The project may be focused at a global, federal, state or community level.

Fellows are selected each year through a national competition based on their commitment to health and ageing issues, leadership potential, and interest in impacting policy. The program has a broad interdisciplinary focus, and fellows have included physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, dieticians, healthcare administrators, epidemiologists, economists, and lawyers from academic and practice settings, spanning career stages from newly minted PhDs to senior professors and community leaders. The program is open to U.S. citizens at all career stages. The program seeks to achieve racial, ethnic, gender, and discipline diversity; applicants from groups that historically have been underrepresented are strongly encouraged to apply.

Eleven years since its creation, the Health and Aging Policy Fellows Program now has 128 Alumni Fellows and 12 current (2019-2020) Fellows, comprised of health and aging professionals from various fields of work, including psychologists, geriatric psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals.

Application deadline: 15 April 2020. Click here to find out more and apply.

Open letter to World Health Organization (and to Member States). WHO must prioritize the needs of older people in its response to the Covid-19 pandemic

Share This