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Dr. Javier Garau

Senior Consultant, Hospital Universitari Mutua de Terrassa, Barcelona Clinic Rotger, Palma de Mallorca

Dr. Javier Garau is a Senior Consultant at Hospital Universitari Mutua de Terrassa, Barcelona Clinic Rotger, Palma de Mallorca in Barcelona.

Languages : English, Spanish

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Garau has past experience as a Specialist in Infectious Disease Service (1977 – 1983) at Hospital de Bellvitge in Barcelona. He was also an Associate Professor of Medicine (1982 – 2010) at the University of Barcelona. Dr. Garau also headed the Department of Medicine (1984 – 2010) at the Hospital Universitari Mutua Terrassa in Barcelona and was Chief, Service of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari Mutua de Terrassa. Dr. Garau is presently serving as Senior Consultant, Hospital Universitari Mutua de Terrassa, Barcelona Clinic Rotger, Palma de Mallorca

MEDIA APPEARANCES

Tehran to host 18th International Congress of Microbiology
Iran News

June 23, 2017

The Iranian Congress of Microbiology brings infectious disease specialists together for presentation and discussion of research in the fields of clinical microbiology and infection from academia, the clinical setting and industry.The congress aims to contribute to improvement in prophylaxis and treatment of infectious diseases throughout the world.The 18th edition of the congress will take place at Tehran University of Medical Sciences on 29-31 August, 2017. Microbiologists, pharmacists, dentists, veterinarians, laboratory scientists and all paramedical courses and related sciences can benefit from the issues raised during the Congress.The International speakers invited from different countries including Prof. Louis Martinez, Prof. Javier Garau, and Prof. Hans-Peter Klenk, will give presentations on the important issues related to the science of microbiology, in the fields of both Clinical and Applied Microbiology.

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Articles

Early clinical assessment of response to treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections: how can it help clinicians? Perspectives from Europe
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents

2016Skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common indication for antibiotic use in Europe and are associated with considerable morbidity. Treatment of SSTIs, occasionally complicated by infection with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, can be resource intensive and lead to high healthcare costs. For patients treated in an inpatient setting, once the acute infection has been controlled, a patient may be discharged on suitable oral antibiotic therapy or outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy. The recently confirmed efficacy of single-dose (e.g. oritavancin) and two-dose (e.g. dalbavancin) infusion therapies as well as tedizolid phosphate, a short-duration therapy available both for intravenous (i.v.) and oral use, for treating SSTIs has highlighted the need for clinicians to re-evaluate their current treatment paradigms. In addition, recent clinical trial data reporting a novel endpoint of early clinical response, defined as change in lesion size at 48–72 h, may be of value in determining which patients are most suitable for early de-escalation of therapy, including switch from i.v. to oral antibiotics, and subsequent early hospital discharge. The aim of this paper is to review the potential impact of assessing clinical response on clinical decision-making in the management of SSTIs in Europe, with a focus on emerging therapies.

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Predictive and prognostic factors in patients with blood-culture-positive community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia
European Respiratory Journal

2016In patients with pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the risk factors for bacteraemia and its impact on outcomes are not fully elucidated. We aimed to compare characteristics of patients with blood-culture-positive versus blood-culture-negative pneumococcal CAP, and to characterise bacteraemic serotypes.We describe a prospective, observational study on nonimmunocompromised patients with pneumococcal CAP, from 1996 to 2013. We define severe pneumonia according to American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines.Of a total of 917 patients with pneumococcal CAP, 362 had blood-culture-positive pneumococcal pneumonia (BCPPP; 39%). High C-reactive protein (CRP) (≥20 mg·dL−1) (odds ratio (OR) 2.36, 95% CI 1.45–3.85), pleural effusion (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.13–3.65) and multilobar involvement (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02–2.79) were independently associated with bacteraemic CAP, while nursing home resident (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01–1.00) was found as a protective factor. Despite the clinical differences, BCPPP showed similar outcomes to blood-culture-negative pneumococcal pneumonia (BCNPP). 14% of the serotypes (period 2006–2013) causing bacteraemia are included in pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PVC7, 74% in pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PVC13 and 83% in pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine PPSV23.Pleural effusion, a high level of CRP and multilobar involvement predicted an increased risk of BCPPP. Although BCPPP patients were more severely ill at admission, mortality was not significantly greater than in BCNPP patients.

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Bacteremic vs. non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in immunocompetent patients: Predictive and prognostic factors
European Respiratory Journal

2016In patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the risk factors for bacteremia, and its impact on major outcomes are not fully elucidated. We aimed to compare characteristics of patients with bacteremic vs. definitive non-bacteraemic pneumococcal CAP, and to characterize serotypes associated with bacteremic disease.We describe a prospective, observational study on non-immunocompromised patients with pneumococcal CAP, from 1996 to 2013.Of a total of 917 patients with pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae,362 with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP; 39%) were identified. High level of C-reactive protein (≥20 mg/dL) (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.45-3.85), pleural effusion (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.13-3.65), and multilobar involvement (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02-2.79) were independently associated with bacteremic CAP in the multivariate analysis, while nursing home resident (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01-1.00) was found as protective factor. Despite the clinical differences, BPP showed similar outcomes to NBPP patients in multivariate analyses (ICU admission, 30-day mortality, and length of hospital stay). 14% of the serotypes (years 2006-2013) causing bacteremia are included in PVC7, 74% in PVC13, and 83% in PPV23.Pleural effusion, a high level of C-reactive protein, and multilobar involvement predicted an increased risk of BPP. Although BPP patients were more severely ill at admission, mortality was not significantly greater than in NBPP patients.

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Diagnosis of Stroke-Associated Pneumonia
American Heart Association | Stroke

2015Background and Purpose—Lower respiratory tract infections frequently complicate stroke and adversely affect outcome. There is currently no agreed terminology or gold-standard diagnostic criteria for the spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections complicating stroke, which has implications for clinical practice and research. The aim of this consensus was to propose standardized terminology and operational diagnostic criteria for lower respiratory tract infections complicating acute stroke.

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How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed in Clinical Stroke Research?
American Heart Association | Stroke

2015Background and Purpose—Diagnosis of pneumonia complicating stroke is challenging, and there are currently no consensus diagnostic criteria. As a first step in developing such consensus-based diagnostic criteria, we undertook a systematic review to identify the existing diagnostic approaches to pneumonia in recent clinical stroke research to establish the variation in diagnosis and terminology.

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Contact

MORE INFORMATION

Area of Expertise

Antibiotic Resistance

Epidemiology

Epidemiology and Antibiotic Resistance

Management of Community-Acquired Infection

Primary Respiratory Pathogens

Vaccines

Affiliation

ESCMID - Member

SEQ, - Member

SEIMC - Member

ASM - Member

ISC - Member

ISID - Member

Industry

Research

Education/Learning

Education

Universitat de Barcelona :

Michael Reese Hospital :

University of Chicago :

Universidad Complutense de Madrid :

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